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Reblogged from islandrandalia
islandrandalia:

A day of Kings — what I wore today.

The pants and shoes aren’t anything to write home about, but the shirt and accessories are on point!  
And I know you were just dying to know what I wore today…

islandrandalia:

A day of Kings — what I wore today.

The pants and shoes aren’t anything to write home about, but the shirt and accessories are on point!  

And I know you were just dying to know what I wore today…

Reblogged from islandrandalia
islandrandalia:

I realize it was days ago, but this Easter was a busy one—and so were the days following.  But yes, Easter… Very busy!
It’s weird for me to write that out.  Mostly because I’m not a religious person anymore.  I used to be.  In fact, I grew up in a pretty Catholic household, in a mostly Catholic area.  I’d even go so far as to say that I was raised in the church—even if I did received reconciliation and communion at a date later than what is considered standard.  I was also confirmed.  Eventually I would leave the church; it wasn’t an instantaneous thing.  And it would be almost ten years before I decided to be an atheist.
But the changing of the seasons always brings back a sense of nostalgia, and a longing for the past (even if we view the past with rose colored glasses).  This year at Easter was no different.
For the Ukrainians, Easter is a big deal—maybe even slightly bigger than Christmas.  When I was a young girl, my Mother and I would spend a few days preparing for Easter.  Not just dyeing eggs, but assembling a basket to be blessed at our local Ukrainian-Catholic church—which involved baking one of my favorite Easter treats, paska.  Other items in the basket include sliced kielbasa, some of the dyed hardboiled eggs, a molded butter sculpture (usually a lamb), cream cheese, and a candle.  After it was assembled, we’d take it to church to be blessed, and then usually these items would be consumed at the Easter Brunch/Dinner with our family.  
These days, things are a little different, but I still manage to have most of those things on my table (provided we’re at home).  This year, instead of a butter sculpture, we had Irish Butter—Kerrygold for the win!—and instead of cream cheese, we had an assortment of fine cheeses.  But there was kielbasa (that actually got eaten yesterday as there was so much food on the table), and hardboiled eggs (I deviled them with avocados and some Dungeness crab).  We also had rack of lamb and oven-roasted rabbit.  So while I think it’s important to hold onto tradition, I also think it’s important to establish your own; even if everyone isn’t down with the shopping-cart mentality, this is what works for me.
At this Easter dinner though, the star of the show was the paska.  I was little nervous, as our two guests for dinner this year are both very accomplished bakers and the first attempt I’d made on my own out in here in Oregon wasn’t exactly a success.  For those of you who don’t know, paska is a traditional Easter bread made in Eastern European countries including Poland, Ukraine, and Slovakia.  For Ukrainians celebrating Easter, Paska is a big deal—at least for all the Ukrainians I knew growing up.  It is said that “the baker of the bread must keep her thoughts pure and the household must remain quiet for the bread to retain its fluffy texture while in the oven.” {Kubuilis}  Also the bread is usually adorned with a braid (the three braids are often said to represent the trinity) and/or a cross, though the pagan symbols of spring celebration mean that you can also find paska adorned with flowers, leaves, birds and suns.  I put a big flower on mine, and a braid (because I like the way it looked, less because of symbolism).  
I’m including my recipe with some notes at the bottom of this post, but if you’re going to attempt it on your own, it’s worth noting that this is a time consuming endeavor—the bread must rise twice, which adds about two hours to the actual time it takes to make.  So unless you want to get up very early on Sunday morning (like I did this Easter), I recommend making it a day ahead of time.  Also, there seems to be some debate about whether or not paska is a sweet or savory bread—I don’t think it’s particularly sweet, but depending on where you’re at geographically, paska can be almost a desert bread; variations include adoring it with fruit—raisins or maraschino cherries—and/or icing.  My recipe is not for a sweet bread.  And please forgive the picture.  It’s the only one that was taken before the bread got devoured…
And now?!  The recipe!  I wish I had one handed down throughout the generations, but I don’t! I’ve tried several and this is pretty much the recipe from “Charlotte’s Slovak Easter Bread Recipe” but scaled down and with some notes added by me.
The Ingredients:
1 cup milk
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
6 ounces (1 1/2sticks) butter
1 1/2 packages active dry yeast
1/2 tablespoon sugar
1/2 cup warm water (no hotter than 110 degrees)
2 large eggs at room temperature
4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tablespoon sugar
Milk or beaten egg yolk
The How-to:
In a small saucepan, heat milk, 1/4 cup sugar, salt and butter over low heat until butter melts and sugar dissolves. Cool to lukewarm (no hotter than 110 degrees). – Make sure you’re mindful of the temperature.  You don’t want to kill your yeast!
Dissolve yeast and 1/2 tablespoon sugar in warm water placed in a mixing bowl or stand mixer bowl that has been warmed. Let proof for 5 minutes. Add eggs, milk mixture and half of the flour. With the dough hook attachment, mix on speed 2 for 1 minute. 
Continue mixing on speed 2, and add remaining flour 1/2 cup at a time and mix about 2 minutes or until dough clings to hook and cleans sides of bowel. Continue mixing 2 minutes longer or until dough is smooth and elastic. It will be sticky to the touch. – It’s worth noting that even with this recipe being half of the original, the flour suggestions for all paska recipes are RIDICULOUS.  I kept about 2-3 cups at the ready because my dough wasn’t coming together enough for my liking.  So I kept adding until it all pulled off the sides of the mixing bowl, but was still plenty sticking.  Also, I used my KitchenAid mixer, and if you decide to go that route, it’s really important that you don’t over-mix and end up with super elastic dough; this makes the braiding/decorating process a nightmare.
Place dough in greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover and let rise in warm place about 1-2 hours or until doubled. Punch down dough and divide into one larger bread portion and a smaller portion for decorating. Shape the bread half into a round loaf and place in a greased round (7x3-inch) bread pan. Using reserved dough, decorate with cross in center or braids around the edge. Cover and let rise in warm place 1-2 hours or until doubled. – Okay, confession time.  I skipped the second proof.  I was tired and getting anxious about the timing of all the other stuff we were gonna cook that day.  So my second proof only lasted long enough for my oven to heat to 350.
Heat oven to 350 degrees. Gently brush tops of risen dough with milk or beaten egg yolk. Bake 40 minutes or until golden brown and instant-read thermometer registers 190 degrees. Remove from pans immediately and cool on wire rack. – I didn’t have any more raw eggs in the house, so I used milk which was a first for me.  But it came out perfect!  And like I said, our baking-inclined pals LOVED it, my partner loved it and it was all I could do to not devour the whole thing on my own!

I finally wrote up my post about paska!  And I touched on what it means to be an atheist who longs for traditions without the trappings of religion.  So, sorry it’s long, but check that shiz out!

islandrandalia:

I realize it was days ago, but this Easter was a busy one—and so were the days following.  But yes, Easter… Very busy!

It’s weird for me to write that out.  Mostly because I’m not a religious person anymore.  I used to be.  In fact, I grew up in a pretty Catholic household, in a mostly Catholic area.  I’d even go so far as to say that I was raised in the church—even if I did received reconciliation and communion at a date later than what is considered standard.  I was also confirmed.  Eventually I would leave the church; it wasn’t an instantaneous thing.  And it would be almost ten years before I decided to be an atheist.

But the changing of the seasons always brings back a sense of nostalgia, and a longing for the past (even if we view the past with rose colored glasses).  This year at Easter was no different.

For the Ukrainians, Easter is a big deal—maybe even slightly bigger than Christmas.  When I was a young girl, my Mother and I would spend a few days preparing for Easter.  Not just dyeing eggs, but assembling a basket to be blessed at our local Ukrainian-Catholic church—which involved baking one of my favorite Easter treats, paska.  Other items in the basket include sliced kielbasa, some of the dyed hardboiled eggs, a molded butter sculpture (usually a lamb), cream cheese, and a candle.  After it was assembled, we’d take it to church to be blessed, and then usually these items would be consumed at the Easter Brunch/Dinner with our family.  

These days, things are a little different, but I still manage to have most of those things on my table (provided we’re at home).  This year, instead of a butter sculpture, we had Irish Butter—Kerrygold for the win!—and instead of cream cheese, we had an assortment of fine cheeses.  But there was kielbasa (that actually got eaten yesterday as there was so much food on the table), and hardboiled eggs (I deviled them with avocados and some Dungeness crab).  We also had rack of lamb and oven-roasted rabbit.  So while I think it’s important to hold onto tradition, I also think it’s important to establish your own; even if everyone isn’t down with the shopping-cart mentality, this is what works for me.

At this Easter dinner though, the star of the show was the paska.  I was little nervous, as our two guests for dinner this year are both very accomplished bakers and the first attempt I’d made on my own out in here in Oregon wasn’t exactly a success.  For those of you who don’t know, paska is a traditional Easter bread made in Eastern European countries including Poland, Ukraine, and Slovakia.  For Ukrainians celebrating Easter, Paska is a big deal—at least for all the Ukrainians I knew growing up.  It is said that “the baker of the bread must keep her thoughts pure and the household must remain quiet for the bread to retain its fluffy texture while in the oven.” {Kubuilis}  Also the bread is usually adorned with a braid (the three braids are often said to represent the trinity) and/or a cross, though the pagan symbols of spring celebration mean that you can also find paska adorned with flowers, leaves, birds and suns.  I put a big flower on mine, and a braid (because I like the way it looked, less because of symbolism).  

I’m including my recipe with some notes at the bottom of this post, but if you’re going to attempt it on your own, it’s worth noting that this is a time consuming endeavor—the bread must rise twice, which adds about two hours to the actual time it takes to make.  So unless you want to get up very early on Sunday morning (like I did this Easter), I recommend making it a day ahead of time.  Also, there seems to be some debate about whether or not paska is a sweet or savory bread—I don’t think it’s particularly sweet, but depending on where you’re at geographically, paska can be almost a desert bread; variations include adoring it with fruit—raisins or maraschino cherries—and/or icing.  My recipe is not for a sweet bread.  And please forgive the picture.  It’s the only one that was taken before the bread got devoured…

And now?!  The recipe!  I wish I had one handed down throughout the generations, but I don’t! I’ve tried several and this is pretty much the recipe from “Charlotte’s Slovak Easter Bread Recipe” but scaled down and with some notes added by me.

The Ingredients:

1 cup milk

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon salt

6 ounces (1 1/2sticks) butter

1 1/2 packages active dry yeast

1/2 tablespoon sugar

1/2 cup warm water (no hotter than 110 degrees)

2 large eggs at room temperature

4 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 tablespoon sugar

Milk or beaten egg yolk

The How-to:

In a small saucepan, heat milk, 1/4 cup sugar, salt and butter over low heat until butter melts and sugar dissolves. Cool to lukewarm (no hotter than 110 degrees). – Make sure you’re mindful of the temperature.  You don’t want to kill your yeast!

Dissolve yeast and 1/2 tablespoon sugar in warm water placed in a mixing bowl or stand mixer bowl that has been warmed. Let proof for 5 minutes. Add eggs, milk mixture and half of the flour. With the dough hook attachment, mix on speed 2 for 1 minute. 

Continue mixing on speed 2, and add remaining flour 1/2 cup at a time and mix about 2 minutes or until dough clings to hook and cleans sides of bowel. Continue mixing 2 minutes longer or until dough is smooth and elastic. It will be sticky to the touch. – It’s worth noting that even with this recipe being half of the original, the flour suggestions for all paska recipes are RIDICULOUS.  I kept about 2-3 cups at the ready because my dough wasn’t coming together enough for my liking.  So I kept adding until it all pulled off the sides of the mixing bowl, but was still plenty sticking.  Also, I used my KitchenAid mixer, and if you decide to go that route, it’s really important that you don’t over-mix and end up with super elastic dough; this makes the braiding/decorating process a nightmare.

Place dough in greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover and let rise in warm place about 1-2 hours or until doubled. Punch down dough and divide into one larger bread portion and a smaller portion for decorating. Shape the bread half into a round loaf and place in a greased round (7x3-inch) bread pan. Using reserved dough, decorate with cross in center or braids around the edge. Cover and let rise in warm place 1-2 hours or until doubled. – Okay, confession time.  I skipped the second proof.  I was tired and getting anxious about the timing of all the other stuff we were gonna cook that day.  So my second proof only lasted long enough for my oven to heat to 350.

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Gently brush tops of risen dough with milk or beaten egg yolk. Bake 40 minutes or until golden brown and instant-read thermometer registers 190 degrees. Remove from pans immediately and cool on wire rack. – I didn’t have any more raw eggs in the house, so I used milk which was a first for me.  But it came out perfect!  And like I said, our baking-inclined pals LOVED it, my partner loved it and it was all I could do to not devour the whole thing on my own!

I finally wrote up my post about paska!  And I touched on what it means to be an atheist who longs for traditions without the trappings of religion.  So, sorry it’s long, but check that shiz out!

Reblogged from maddylouboo

maddylouboo:

I’m wearing tight fitting jeggings AND a tight fitting shirt, which I don’t normally do. I like it, though.

That shirt is awesome!  Where did you get it?

Reblogged from animegirlrunningwithtoast

HEY PLUS SIZE FOLK, AND FRIENDS OF PLUS SIZE FOLK. WE NEED YOUR HELP.

animegirlrunningwithtoast:

YOU KNOW HOW OUR CLOTHING OPTIONS SUCK.

WELL LOOK AT THIS.

THIS IS FAT TAX, AN INDIE GOGO COMPAIGN TO MAKE AFFORDABLE PLUS SIZE WEAR 

YOU HEARD ME. AFFORDABLE. PLUS SIZE. WEAR. 

BUT THEY NEED YOUR HELP. 

IT NEEDS 5000$ GET UP AND RUNNING AND IT’S ONLY 620$

PLEASE DONATE IF YOU CAN, AND IF NOT SIGNAL BOOST IT.

DO IT FOR ALL THE PLUS SIZE PEEPS WHO JUST WANNA LOOK CUTE TOO. 

Boost here too!

Reblogged from female-erection

female-erection:

Just because a girl is nice to you doesn’t mean she want to touch your gross shrimp dick

(via unicornisms)

Reblogged from islandrandalia
islandrandalia:

mightyfemme - you’re the best! Rocking some awesome footwear! Aww yeah!

The self-love shoes!

islandrandalia:

mightyfemme - you’re the best! Rocking some awesome footwear! Aww yeah!

The self-love shoes!

Reblogged from basedgosh

basedgosh:

basedgosh:

note to self: “love yourself” does not mean spend $40 on chinese food when you’re broke

who am i kidding yes it does. never listen to me

I spent the forty on shoes…

(via sweetjanesays)

Reblogged from moonflowerchilde

moonflowerchilde:

Giving away 20 mini crystals as seen on my etsy. REBLOG THIS POST. I WILL CHOOSE A RANDOM WINNER TONIGHT AND SHIP TOMORROW. 

(via unskinny)

Reblogged from islandrandalia
islandrandalia:

Kind of sad lately. I’ve been gaining weight pretty steadily. Mostly because I have NO energy lately; wake up tired, get worn out from work, and then it’s the occasional late night shenanigan with the ferm boys, or collapsing into bed. 

Which means most of my trousers don’t fit. Which makes me sad. 

So today, I came home in search of clothes that fit (and to spend quality time with my pooch) and found some shorts! It’s finally warm enough to wear them! So me and my fat babe booty and hairy legs are gonna go have a fun night!

And maybe I’ll get back on the fitness train; and maybe I’ll buy bigger pants. But I will continue to work to love and accept myself. Fo real.

Aww yeah.

islandrandalia:

Kind of sad lately. I’ve been gaining weight pretty steadily. Mostly because I have NO energy lately; wake up tired, get worn out from work, and then it’s the occasional late night shenanigan with the ferm boys, or collapsing into bed.

Which means most of my trousers don’t fit. Which makes me sad.

So today, I came home in search of clothes that fit (and to spend quality time with my pooch) and found some shorts! It’s finally warm enough to wear them! So me and my fat babe booty and hairy legs are gonna go have a fun night!

And maybe I’ll get back on the fitness train; and maybe I’ll buy bigger pants. But I will continue to work to love and accept myself. Fo real.

Aww yeah.

Reblogged from islandrandalia
islandrandalia:

Winner winner!

Mondays are usually a big bummer. It’s usually the most overwhelming day but this was pretty low key, even if there were mild moments of scramble. 

Also, it helps being able to whip up a sweet dinner that looks fancier than it is—the sprouts are leftovers, and the potatoes are instant, and the chicken?! Thawed and seasoned last night. Boom. 

It also helps to have hope; there is a good chance we’re gonna move to CA for 9 months and live near the ocean, and that, while terrifying, is also amazing!

I’m not always a sad drunk mess.Sometimes I’m fabulous. Sometimes I make a full chicken dinner on a Monday like a boss.

islandrandalia:

Winner winner!

Mondays are usually a big bummer. It’s usually the most overwhelming day but this was pretty low key, even if there were mild moments of scramble.

Also, it helps being able to whip up a sweet dinner that looks fancier than it is—the sprouts are leftovers, and the potatoes are instant, and the chicken?! Thawed and seasoned last night. Boom.

It also helps to have hope; there is a good chance we’re gonna move to CA for 9 months and live near the ocean, and that, while terrifying, is also amazing!

I’m not always a sad drunk mess.

Sometimes I’m fabulous.

Sometimes I make a full chicken dinner on a Monday like a boss.